Strikingly

A day without women; fighting Trump fatigue syndrome; and more.


  • Opposition watch: In honor of A Day Without a Woman (an initiative by the Women’s March) on this International Women’s Day, today, March 8, 2017, the better half of Civic Hall will be offline (including my colleague Jessica McKenzie). If you are also joining in and are here in NYC, come commemorate the day by participating in Civic Hall’s all-day programming, co-sponsored by New America, GenEquality, and #ActionWednesday.

  • Here’s a good backgrounder on the strike and how it came together, by Ellie Shechet in Jezebel.

  • Some women’s news sites are taking the day off, while at others like Jezebel the male staffers are working while the women are not. Kara Bloomgarden-Smoke of Women’s Wear Daily has a complete run=down.

  • Two large schools districts—the Alexandria City public schools in Virginia and Chapel Hill Carrboro county in North Carolina—are closing for the day, Valerie Richardson reports for The Washington Times.

  • Much of the continuing work of the Women’s March(es) is taking place in living rooms and town halls far from the media spotlight, report Grace Wong and Marwa Eltagouri for The Chicago Tribune.

  • From A Day Without Women to Un Dia Sin Immigrants (a Day without Immigrants). That’s what May 1st is shaping up to be if Cosecha, a new group quietly organizing immigrant and undocumented workers, gets its way, as Rodelfo Saavedra writes for The Nation.

  • Protests against the new version of Trump’s travel ban are being aggregated here by Jess Morales Rocketto.

  • Andrea Grimes reports for Rewire on the results of a 200-person San Francisco hackathon last weekend devoted to expanding abortion access.

  • Triggered by the election of Donald Trump and his combustive personality and policy moves, millions of Americans are in motion, forming and joining groups, rallying, signing and sharing petitions, and searching for ways to demonstrate their opposition. One challenge many local groups are facing is how to manage rapid growth, and in this new piece in Civicist—collaboratively written with the help of several participants and close observers—I look at how a sampling of Indivisible groups, Womens March groups, the Environmental Data Governance Initiative, and Get Organized Brooklyn are evolving.

  • Related: With the help of prior research by Kate Oh and members of Civic Hall’s “Call to Action” group, we’ve built a “Resist Projects” spreadsheet that aims to track and sort all the emerging efforts by function. The easy to remember url is bit.ly/OrganizeResistTech.

  • This story by Caitlyn Luce Christensen in The Huffington Post on the problems roiling the Indivisible Pittsburgh group illustrates well the problems that new groups founded by people who barely know each other and are trying to come together fast often face.

  • In case you missed it: Here’s the announcement for Personal Democracy Forum 2017, taking place June 8-9 at NYU. The theme is “What We Do Now.”

  • Crypto-wars, continued: WikiLeaks has released thousands of documents that it says describes the CIA’s hacking tools, Scott Shane, Mark Mazzetti and Matthew Rosenberg report for The New York Times.

  • WikiLeaks claims the CIA has figured out how to bypass encryption on services like Signal, WhatsApp and Telegram, but Open Whisper Systems, the maker of the strong encryption protocol used by Signal says the real news is that the CIA has ways of getting malware onto phones, not to break its encryption services.

  • Sam Biddle and Micah Lee of The Intercept elaborate on that point.

  • Slate’s Fred Kaplan writes, “there is nothing in these documents, nothing even in the WikiLeaks introduction, to suggest that the CIA uses any of these devices to spy on American citizens. Assuming that is the case, there is nothing improper about any of these programs. This is what spy agencies do: They spy.”

  • On the other hand, as Ben Wizner of the ACLU’s Speech, Privacy and Technology pointed out, it appears the CIA was deliberately allowing vulnerabilities (known as “zero days”) to go unaddressed in order to make its job easier. He told the Times, ““Those vulnerabilities will be exploited not just by our security agencies, but by hackers and governments around the world. Patching security holes immediately, not stockpiling them, is the best way to make everyone’s digital life safer.”

  • Trump watch, literally: Yesterday, the President of the United States spent the first two hours of his day watching Fox & Friends and tweeting his reactions to the show, as Jenna Johnson relates for The Washington Post.

  • How to fight “Trump Fatigue Syndrome,” by Lee Drutman

  • The Atlantic Council’s Digital Forensics Lab reports that an online army of bots is behind far-right French presidential candidate’s Marine Le Pen’s prominence on social media. The election is April 23.

  • Stephanie Lee takes a deep dive for BuzzFeed into the corners of the internet that hate science.

  • This is civic tech: New York City marked the fifth anniversary of its Open Data law with a refresh of its NYC Open Data portal. Among its new features: how-to guides for getting started with datasets and tools and a customer support app for getting help. The site has 135,000 average monthly users.

  • Brian Purchia and Liz Purchia Gannon have launched Riff City Strategies, aiming to work with civic, environmental and tech leaders on communications and advocacy. Here’s a post by him expressing his hopes for the field.